Health Behavior Courses (HB)

Health Behavior Courses (HB)

HB 600. Social and Behavioral Science Core. This Masters level course fulfills the social and behavioral sciences core requirement for MPH students.  It is designed to provide an overview of the social and behavioral sciences in public health to non-Health Behavior masters’ level students in UAB’s School of Public Health.  Social and behavioral science theories and strategies in public health will be discussed in relation to preventing disease and promoting health over the life course.  The course is comprised of two major sections: (1) overview of fundamentals of social and behavioral sciences in public health and (2) social and behavioral science research and strategies and application of social and behavioral sciences in public health practice and policy.  This course is intended to provide students with the most current knowledge and analysis of issues influencing people’s health and well-being from a social and behavioral science perspective.  Theoretical frameworks that draw on major health behavior theories will provide a better understanding of how individuals, families, peers, schools, neighborhoods, and the larger community influence risk and protective factors.  Ethical considerations intrinsic to social and behavioral science efforts designed to produce health-related behavior change will be discussed.  The course will promote intellectual and collaborative learning through course lectures, readings, class discussions, and individual and group work.  Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours. (Lanzi)

HB 600Q. Social and Behavioral Science Core (On-line). This Masters level course fulfills the social and behavioral sciences core requirement for MPH students.  It is designed to provide an overview of the social and behavioral sciences in public health to non-Health Behavior masters’ level students in UAB’s School of Public Health.  Social and behavioral science theories and strategies in public health will be discussed in relation to preventing disease and promoting health over the life course.  The course is comprised of two major sections: (1) overview of fundamentals of social and behavioral sciences in public health and (2) social and behavioral science research and strategies and application of social and behavioral sciences in public health practice and policy.  This course is intended to provide students with the most current knowledge and analysis of issues influencing people’s health and well-being from a social and behavioral science perspective.  Theoretical frameworks that draw on major health behavior theories will provide a better understanding of how individuals, families, peers, schools, neighborhoods, and the larger community influence risk and protective factors.  Ethical considerations intrinsic to social and behavioral science efforts designed to produce health-related behavior change will be discussed.  .  The course will promote intellectual and collaborative learning through course lectures, readings, class discussions, and individual and group work. Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours. (Lanzi)

HB 602. Alcohol and Drug Abuse. History and theory of human substance use and abuse.  Empirical foundations of alcohol and drug abuse, diagnosis, assessment, treatment, and prevention. Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours. (Hendricks)

HB 605. Physical Activity and Health. This seminar course is an introduction to research and practice related to physical activity promotion from a public health perspective and will describe health benefits, epidemiological data, national recommendations and plans, and global initiatives related to physical activity. Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours. (Pekmezi)

HB 624. Advanced Theory and Practice in Behavioral Science. Advanced review of selected behavioral science concepts and theories useful for developing health promotion programs; social cognitive theory and the transtheoretical model of change are examined in depth.  This course may be required for some MPH students. Course will be graded by letter.  3 hours.  (Pekmezi)

HB 624Q. Advanced Theory and Practice in Behavioral Science (Online).  Advanced review of selected behavioral science concepts and theories useful for developing health promotion programs; social cognitive theory and the transtheoretical model of change are examined in depth.  This course may be required for some MPH students. Course will be graded by letter.  3 hours.  (Pekmezi)

HB 627. GIS for Public Health.    This is an introductory course covering the theory and application of geographic information systems (GIS) for public health. Through this course, students will develop basic GIS skills, including GIS operations such as buffering, geocoding, layering, and spatial queries. Students will learn how to use those operations to both describe and propose solutions for public health challenges. The course will address introductory cartography and basic statistical aspects of spatial analysis. Learning will occur through lab exercises, case studies and homework exercises. The course will consist of one hour-long lecture/discussion and two hours of supervised lab/lecture each week.  Course will be graded by letter.  3 hours (Creger)

HB 635. Communities, Families and Health. This course is designed for graduate students in public health and related fields interested in working with families and communities to improve health outcomes.  It is intended to provide students with a broader understanding of the structural and psychosocial factors related to health and well-being.  To do so, the course will focus on theoretical frameworks that draw on an ecological perspective and examine how factors associated with families, peers, schools, neighborhoods, and communities influence health.  Emphasis will also be placed on the relevance of individual and community assets for the science of Health Behavior and the broader public health arena.  Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours (Davies)

HB 636. Intervention Development.  This course is intended to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the range and diversity of intervention approaches to behavior change and their application in public health. Emphasis will be placed on developing skills for designing interventions: a) in various public health settings, b) for specific population subgroups, c) based on determinants identified to be most influential and amenable to intervention, and d) within the confines of available resources. Students will also apply previously acquired research methods skills to design targeted interventions that are salient to needs of particular audiences, including formative research, theory selection, process evaluation, implementation tracking and outcome evaluation. This course uses lecture and seminar format.  Course will be graded by letter. Pre-requisite HB 624.  3 hours (Davies)

HB 636Q. Intervention Development (Online).  This course is intended to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the range and diversity of intervention approaches to behavior change and their application in public health. Emphasis will be placed on developing skills for designing interventions: a) in various public health settings, b) for specific population subgroups, c) based on determinants identified to be most influential and amenable to intervention, and d) within the confines of available resources. Students will also apply previously acquired research methods skills to design targeted interventions that are salient to needs of particular audiences, including formative research, theory selection, process evaluation, implementation tracking and outcome evaluation. This course uses lecture and seminar format.  Course will be graded by letter. Pre-requisite HB 624.  3 hours (Davies)

HB 638Q. Public Health Promotion and Aging Seminar (Online). Exploration of current problems of the elderly, introduction to broad principles of health promotion for the elderly and review model health promotion programs. Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours (Department)

HB 641. Research Methods in Behavioral Sciences. Review of research methodology in behavioral sciences.  Topic include: formulating research questions, knowledge and causality, experimental and quasi-experimental designs, reliability and validity, reporting findings and grant writing. Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours (Andreae/Fontaine).

HB 641. Research Methods in Behavioral Sciences (Online).   Review of research methodology in behavioral sciences.  Topic include: formulating research questions, knowledge and causality, experimental and quasi-experimental designs, reliability and validity, reporting findings and grant writing. Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours (Andreae/Fontaine).

HB 643. Health Program Evaluation.  Principles and procedures to evaluate health promotion/disease prevention programs: data collection methods, instrument-scale development, measurement, evaluation designs and analysis of case studies of disease prevention literature on evaluation. Course will be graded by letter. Prerequisite: HB 641. 3 hours. (Department)

HB 643Q. Health Program Evaluation (Online).  Principles and procedures to evaluate health promotion/disease prevention programs: data collection methods, instrument-scale development, measurement, evaluation designs and analysis of case studies of disease prevention literature on evaluation. Course will be graded by letter. Prerequisite: HB 641. 3 hours. (Department)

HB 660. Adolescent Health: A Social and Behavioral Perspective. This Masters level course provides an overview of critical health issues in adolescence and reviews the potential of emerging perspectives to advance adolescent health and promote positive youth development.  This course is designed to provide students with the most current knowledge and analysis of issues influencing the health and well-being of adolescents.  Theoretical frameworks that draw on an ecological perspective will provide a better understanding of how families, peers, schools, neighborhoods, and the larger community influence risk and protective factors in youth.  Adolescence is a time of growth and experimentation, a period marked by establishing autonomy and confronting new challenges.  Emphasis will be placed on the promotion of positive youth development, and the relevance of adolescent health issues for the science of health behavior and the broader public health arena.  The course will promote intellectual and collaborative contributions of students through class discussions, activities, and presentations. Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours (Lanzi)

HB 692. Principles and Practices of Community Organization. Seminar designed as an integrative experience for persons working with community groups.  The focus is on learning to use available resources and advocating change to maximize community involvement.  Students will complete a community-based project, applying community theories, asset mapping, Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) and other approaches. Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours (Department)

HB 695. Seminar on Selected Health Behavior Topics. Seminar covering a variety of health behavior topics.  Course will be graded as Pass/No Pass. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 3 hours.

HB 697. Internship. Field experience under joint direction of appropriate faculty member and qualified health education specialist. Written report specifying activities, products, and outcomes of experience submitted upon completion of internship. Course will be graded as Pass/No Pass. 3 hours.

HB 698. Master's Directed Research. Independent study with guidance of appropriate faculty. Includes activities such as literature review and evaluation. Course will be graded as Pass/No Pass. 1 - 9 hours.

HB 699. Master's Project Research. Research for project under direction of research project committee. Course will be graded as Pass/No Pass. 3-6 hours.

HB 701. Theory-Based Measurement Development. The aim of this course is to introduce students to measurement development based on well-specified behavioral theories.  This course will review and discuss key issues related to measurement development such as item/scale development, number of factors to retain rotation options and statistical programs. Prerequisite: Requires knowledge of elementary probability and statistics for non-statistics majors and BST 611.  Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours (Hendricks)

HB 703:  Writing for the Behavioral Sciences.  The aim of this course is to develop and fine-tune science writing proficiency.  In this course, students will read and critique essays and articles about science, medicine and public health. Students will also complete numerous writing assignments and participate in peer review. (Fontaine)

HB 706. Energetics: Scientific Foundations of Obesity and Other Health Aspects.  The aim of this course is to introduce students to the fundamental principles of energetics and the causes, consequences, and treatment of obesity. The course will review the causes and consequences of obesity from an interdisciplinary scientific perspective including, but not limited to, physiology, sociology, and psychology. Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours (Pavela)

HB 724. Advanced Social and Behavioral Science Theory for Doctoral Candidates. This course focuses on a thorough examination of theories and models of behavior change and their applications in both research and implementation in various fields of health promotion and public health. Basic knowledge of research methodology and statistics is required. Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours. (Pekmezi)

HB 730. Health Communication Research. This course is designed to investigate the role of communication theories and research methods in promoting public health and preventing disease.  Theoretical background in communication and behavioral science, research methods appropriate for mass media campaigns and practical communication/intervention development methods will be addressed. Course will be graded by letter.  3 hours

HB 736. Advanced Research Intervention Design. The aim of this course is to teach doctoral students how to develop, implement, and evaluate the efficacy of rigorous, theory-based, consumer driven behavioral interventions. In this course, students will learn and apply a variety of evidence-based methods and strategies for developing targeted behavioral interventions to meet the needs of specific audiences. In addition to the textbook, students will read and critique a number of scientific articles of interventions that vary widely by content area, outcome targets, settings and populations. Students will complete writing assignments and develop a comprehensive research intervention development, implementation, and evaluation plan.  3 hours (Davies)

HB 740. Advanced Program Evaluation. Advanced review of evaluation theories, approaches, and methods for assessing the plans, implementation, and effectiveness of health promotion programs. Course will be graded by letter. Prerequisite: HB 643 or other master's level evaluation course and a graduate level multiple regression or multivariate statistics course. 3 hours. (Department)

HB 741. Clinical Research Methods in the Behavioral Sciences.   This course provides an overview of the major research methods and designs used in public health. Emphasis is given to the experimental, quasi-experimental, and correlational designs as well as to methods of collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data generated from randomized trials. Other topics include evaluating published research, writing research proposals and reports, and the ethical obligations of researchers. 3 hours (Pavela)

HB 742. Mediation & Moderation in Behavioral Science Research.  This course is an elective course for doctoral students in public health and related fields, designed to provide an exposure to statistical mediation and moderation. Mediation and moderation are central in social and behavioral science research.  Mediation explains and tests the underlying mechanisms by which the predictor variable affects the outcome variable, while moderation specifies under what conditions the predictor affects the outcome. Statistical techniques investigating mediation and moderation are among the most widely used data analysis techniques in a variety of disciplines.  The primary goal of this course is to provide students with theoretical concepts of mediation and moderation and hands-on experience with relevant analytical techniques.   Prerequisite: Students should have taken courses on multiple regression such as BST 611, BST or other equivalent courses.  Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours. (Pavela)

HB 760. Planning and Administration of Health Education and Promotion Programs. The purpose of this course is to teach students to effectively design, implement, and manage health promotion programs using the PRECEDE-PROCEED framework and other planning models. Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours (Paschal)

HB 770. Doctoral Studies Seminar.   This seminar is designed to meet the specific needs of graduate students by better preparing them for successful completion of their respective degrees as well as their future as health education professionals.  Course will be graded by letter.  1 hour (Lanzi)

HB 773. Doctoral Studies Seminar III.  This course is the third of a series of three 1-hour Doctoral Seminar classes.  This seminar series is designed to meet the specific needs of graduate students by better preparing them for successful completion of their respective degrees as well as their future as health education professionals.   Course will be graded by letter. Pre-requisites HB: 771 & 772. 1 hour (Lanzi)

HB 798. Doctoral Directed Research. Independent study with guidance of senior public health faculty. Course will be graded as Pass/No Pass. 1 - 9 hours.

HB 799. Dissertation Research. Research for dissertation under direction of dissertation committee.  Course will be graded as Pass/No Pass. Prerequisite:  Students must be admitted to candidacy in order to register for this class.1 - 9 hours